Blog (filtered)

Being a leader takes practice. We’re excited to share our latest experiments and lessons learned.

Carolyn Cullen
Tuesday, February 28, 2017

You’ve likely heard about 360° assessments, but have you ever participated in one? This kind of assessment gathers feedback from your peers, managers, direct reports, and others who have seen you in action, typically at work (although you may also gather feedback from folks outside of UVA). At the same time your raters are taking the survey, you also complete the same assessment as the ratee. The resulting report gives you a 360° view of your strengths and development opportunities. Perhaps the most important thing to know about 360° surveys is that they are anonymous and confidential, which is vital. As the ratee, you won’t know who has completed the survey, with the exception of your direct manager (assuming you have only one). It’s important for the raters to know they can be truthful while also being helpful.

Once you receive your survey results, you can see if there is alignment between your view of your strengths and opportunities and those of your raters. If not, you can usually drill deeper in your final report to see if the misalignment is coming from one particular audience (i.e. your peers), so you know with whom to direct your efforts.

After you’ve had time to reflect on the results, it’s time to come up with a plan to focus on the areas of opportunity selected for you. But how do you convey that you’re doing that? It’s not like you’ll walk around with a sign saying, “I’m now more approachable” or “I’m now more open to others’ input.” Putting your 360° feedback into an action plan typically involves small tweaks rather than holistic changes. Think about it as turning a dial up or down one click instead of turning it from one to 100.  

Taking a 360° can be an important step on your leadership journey, though it does require you to be a bit vulnerable. But don’t you want to know if you’re being as effective and impactful as you intend? And if you find that you’re not, developing your action plan to improve likely means making some little changes that will have a big impact.