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Being a leader takes practice. We’re excited to share our latest experiments and lessons learned.

Samantha Campbell
Friday, April 21, 2017

I recently watched a video that was part of the Supersoul Session series. It featured psychologist Shawn Achor, who talks about the science of happiness and the issue with the current formula for happiness and success. I was immediately interested in the topic, and pleasantly surprised with his quick sense of humor. (Although, I suppose someone who specializes in the science of happiness would naturally be funny!)

You may be familiar with this formula: “work harder = become successful = be happier.” It has been instilled in many people from a young age. Lately, I’ve been having an internal conflict with this way of thinking. Why do we need to work harder in order to be successful? Why does happiness need to be so hard to obtain? Now, I’m not saying that working hard isn’t a good thing. I worked hard to buy my first home, to raise my daughter (especially through the continuous and everlasting sleepless nights), to be good at my job, and to be a good person, but is that the only way to achieve happiness?

I started thinking: how is my life different when I’m happy? When I’m happy, I believe I’m enjoyable to be around. I’m much more inspired, creative, and productive, and things often come to fruition more easily. What would life look like if we followed our bliss and put happiness first? It would be a revolution of humanity as we know it, and I believe it’s starting now. We are stretching, pushing, creating, and growing our minds, and we’re changing how we function in this world. This stems from the urge to pursue greater happiness. It is bubbling at the surface, waiting to overflow from the cast iron pot we live in.

It’s a positive way of mind, and it’s extremely contagious. I love the “experiment” Achor did during his talk, where he speaks of mirror neurons and how easy it is to spread happiness to others. I’m interested in trying his 21 day challenge: every day, for 21 days, write down three things you’re grateful for and see what positive differences occur in your life. I’m going to give it a try! Will you? Watch the video.